Mastering the One-Sentence Introduction

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You’re at a networking event and match eyes with someone you don’t know. They start walking over to you and extend their hand. You both say, “Hello,” and then comes the million-dollar question, “What do you do?” At that instant, do you know exactly what to say or do you bumble around trying to compose a fluid sentence? If you’re the latter, don’t fret! We’re giving out a few points of consideration in order to formulate and master the perfect one-sentence introduction.

What Is Your Job Title?

This is self-explanatory. When you’re telling people about what you do, you obviously need to tell them what type of job you’re undertaking at the moment. If you have a job title that most people won’t understand right off the bat, consider having a small spiel that describes what your job title entails.

What Does Your Company Do?

Unless you’re working for a really big name company, people aren’t always going to know your company and what it does. In order to sound like a pro when introducing yourself, you should definitely know what makes your company tick. If you’re unsure, check out your company’s ‘About Us’ or “Mission Statement.’ You’ll see how your company tells other people what they do directly from their own perspective.

Who Do You Serve?

Who is your typical client? What are your clients’ jobs? What’s their age group? If you don’t necessarily have clients, think about your audience. Who are the people you are trying to target?

What Problem Do You Solve?

What problem is your job or company trying to tackle? How do others benefit from working with you and/or your company? Think about why you or the company got started in the first place. Chances are, it was because you saw a need and wanted to do something for the greater good.

How Do You Solve That Problem?

What exactly do you do for your clients? Do you sell a product? Do you teach people new skills? Figure out the intricate features and processes you use to combat the problem mentioned in the previous question.

Once you’ve considered all the different aspects, it’s time to put it together. When you introduce yourself to someone, you don’t want to sound like a robot. Assemble all the pieces in a way that sounds natural to you. You don’t want to feel uncomfortable or awkward explaining yourself, so don’t write it out that way! It should be short, to the point, and hits all the major parts of what you do. Write out a few different examples and pick the one that you like best!

  1. 1

    “I’m a writer for a branding company that holds 2-day workshops for bloggers and small business owners teaching them graphic design, photography, social media, and business development skills.”

     

  2. 2

    “I’m a writer for Bloguettes, a company that holds two-day branding workshops for people who want to learn graphic design, photography, social media, and business.”

     

  3. 3

    “I’m a writer for Bloguettes, a company that holds two-day branding workshops for bloggers and small business owners that want to learn how to better brand themselves and their companies.”

  4. 4

    “I’m a writer for a branding company that teaches bloggers and small business owners how to better brand themselves using graphic design, photography, and social media skills.”

These are just a few examples of how you can put together an introduction. Play around with different responses and choose the one that flows most naturally. The next time you shake a hand and get asked, “What do you do?” you’ll be ready to confidently answer with your handy dandy one-sentence introduction. Happy networking!